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Best Southwest Juneteenth Celebration
Best Southwest Juneteenth Celebration Information                              
  • When: June 18, 2016                                                                                                    
  • Time:  5:00 - 10:00 p.m.
  • Meadow Creek Park                                                                                                                  
  • 1400 UHL Road
  • DeSoto, Texas   

The City of Cedar Hill and Best of Southwest cities join together for the Juneteenth Arts & Music Festival: Celebrating Freedom through Diversity, honoring the oldest known celebration of the ending of slavery. Activities include food vendors, a variety of art by local artist, crafts in the Kids on the Hill Creative Arts Zone, musical performances and much more. 

Entertainment on the main stage includes performances by Rattletree Marimba of Austin, TX , Memphis Soul of Dallas, TX and the infamous and nationally known Dazz Band, who's biggest hit songs include the Grammy Award-winning "Let It Whip". You don't want to miss this evening of community celebrations, great music, and arts, all for FREE!

  • 2014 Juneteenth @ City of Duncanville, Texas

Sponsored by: DeSoto, Lancaster, Duncanville and Cedar Hill 

For more information contact Carolyn Campbell at 972.230.9651 or email .

The Best Southwest area which includes DeSoto, Duncanville, Cedar Hill and Lancaster is so named because of the cities’ ability to work together on projects that benefit Southern Dallas County. On June 19, 2004, these cities cooperated once again on a history making event by co-sponsoring a first-ever Best Southwest Juneteenth Celebration. The event rotates to each city every year.

Juneteenth is the oldest known celebration of the ending of slavery. Dating back to 1865, it was on June 19th that Union soldiers, led by Major General Gordon Granger, landed at Galveston, Texas with the news that the Civil War had ended and that all slaves were now free. This was two and a half years after President Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation – which had become official on January 1, 1863. In subsequent years, African Americans celebrated Juneteenth with music, skits, barbecuing, picnics and ethnic dress.

Performers at Juneteenth Celebration